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All information on this site is through my own findings and is believed to be correct. Any corrections, errors or admissions that need to be made, or artists that would like to be involved in BOX=ART, please feel free to contact me.

You are watching: Metal gear solid cover art


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About BOX=ART

BOX=ART is a site dedicated to the history of video game box art/ cover art and the artists responsible for them.

Box arts are profiled from a variety of angles using high quality scans and with the intention of acknowledging the men and women who have played such a major role in shaping our gaming experiences.

Not only for video game enthusiasts, BOX=ART is for all who enjoy quality artwork.


Japanese artwork, first published by Konami in 1987.

Designed for the worldwide market. MSX version pictured.

Also available on: Commodore 64, DOS, Famicom, Gamecube, NES.

The series debut box art, Metal Gear, would paint it’s portrait of hero Snake reminiscing the all American, silver-screen action hero of the day.This G.I Joe look-alike would in fact be modeled on actor Michael Biehn in his role as Kyle Reece from the original Terminator movie, and lacked the resemblance of who Snake was to become in the Solid series.

The box art would be used across all territories, a feat still uncommon at the time, and possibly due to its western-friendly look. Its artist, whose unknown at present, was likely Japanese due to it being published on the MSX and Famicom before the NES, and if so is an early example of an American model being used to promote a Japanese game.

The box art would get a re-release in Japan when it was included as an extra in the Gamecube’s Metal Gear Solid: The Twin Snakes console pack.


Metal Gear


Japanese artwork, first published by Konami in 2001.

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Designed for the EU/ NA PlayStation 2 markets.

Also available on: na.

The first cover to truely depict Solid Snake. Much like the original box art the movie pastiche would remain with the newly grizzled anti-hero taking clues from Carpenter’s: Snake Plissken, whilst sharing the physical look of both Jean Claude Van Damme and Christopher Walken. Even with all the western influence Snake’s chartacter art would now be firmly Japanese in style.

Yuji would turn Snake into the shadowy figure he always was with his Pentel brush pen artisry. His flowing, freestyle complemented the character’s rugged, worn persona perfectly.