Caio Zamboni 1 ,Alexandre Maris Yonamine 2 ,Carlos Eduardo Nunes Faria 2 ,Marco Antonio Machado Filho 2 ,Ralph Walter Christian 2 ,Marcelo Tomanik Mercadante 3


You are watching: When is the tertiary survey completed for a trauma patient

Affiliations

1 Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department of Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericóridia de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: caiozamboni
hotmail.com. 2 Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department of Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericóridia de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. 3 Santa Casa de São Paulo Medical School and Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department of Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericóridia de São Paulo, Brazil.
Caio Zamboni 1 ,Alexandre Maris Yonamine 2 ,Carlos Eduardo Nunes Faria 2 ,Marco Antonio Machado Filho 2 ,Ralph Walter Christian 2 ,Marcelo Tomanik Mercadante 3

Affiliations

1 Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department of Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericóridia de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: caiozamboni
hotmail.com. 2 Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department of Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericóridia de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. 3 Santa Casa de São Paulo Medical School and Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department of Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericóridia de São Paulo, Brazil.

Introduction: Medical personnel in trauma centres in several countries have realised that undiagnosed injuries are common and are now focussing their attention on reducing the incidence of these injuries. Tertiary survey is a simple and easy approach to address the issue of undiagnosed injuries in trauma patients. Tertiary survey consists of reevaluating patients 24 hours after admission by means of an anamnesis protocol, physical examination, review of complementary tests and request for new tests when necessary.

Objective: To show the importance of tertiary survey in trauma patients for diagnosing injuries undetected at the time of initial survey.

Methods: A standardised protocol was used to perform a prospective observational study with patients admitted through the emergency department, Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma, Santa Casa de São Paulo. The patients were reevaluated 24 hours after admission or after recovering consciousness. New physical examinations were performed, tests performed on admission were reassessed and new tests were requested, when necessary.

Results: Between February 2012 and February 2013, 526 patients were evaluated, 81 (15.4%) were polytraumatised, and 445 (84.6%) had low-energy trauma. A total of 57 new injuries were diagnosed in 40 patients, 61.4% of which affected the lower limb. Diagnosis of 11 new injuries (19.3%) resulted in changes in procedure.

Conclusion: The application of the protocol for tertiary survey proved to be easy, inexpensive and beneficial to patients (particularly polytraumatised patients) because it enabled identification of important injuries that were not detected on admission in a large group of patients.


Keywords: Delayed diagnosis; Diagnostic errors; Multiple trauma; Neglected diseases.



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